How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash

How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash

The title of this post says it all… today, I’m going to show you, step-by-step, how to spiralize a butternut squash. Many of you asked me for a tutorial after Monday’s and Tuesday’s post, and I’m happy you did! 

To start off, let’s make sure we are spiralizing the right shape of butternut squash. As I mentioned on Monday, choose a butternut squash that is as evenly cylindrical as possible. Big bulbous bottoms are not favorable here. Ha, I chuckled to myself writing that sentence. Tehe. The bottoms of the squashes (where they get wider) are where the seeds are and that part cannot be spiralized. The picture at the top of this post is the ideal size for spiralizing.

Once you’ve got your squash, cut the bulbous end off. 

How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash

Next, cut off the opposite end of the part of the squash you will be using.

How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash  

Now, peel the squash, trying to get rid of all the green parts so that the tough outer skin is completely removed. I’m not going to sugar coat this part, it’s obnoxious. It takes a little bit of time (about 5 minutes) and you may have to peel multiple layers off before the orange inside skin pops through. 

How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash

This vegetable is now about 6 inches long. You’re going to want to cut it in half to about 3 inches to make it easier to spiralize, like you would with any vegetable. The pen is for perspective, obviously.

How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash

Time to spiralize! Load one of the halves into the spiralizer. Press the teeth of the handle into the squash so that it is secure. When you spiralize, use the bottom handle for leverage and push while you crank the other handle.

How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash

How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash

How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash

Once the squash is spiralized, pull apart the noodles to make single strands. This isn’t crucial, as the noodles will separate once warmed up, but they make it easier overall to cook.

How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash

There you have it, the tutorial is done. You’re ready to prepare your butternut squash noodles! That 3″ piece of the squash yields this many noodles (about enough to serve 2):

How to Spiralize a Butternut Squash

Lastly, keep in mind that butternut squash noodles are firmer than zucchini noodles. They take longer to cook in a skillet (about 5-7 minutes to soften).

UPDATE: Another way to cook the noodles is to roast them at 400 degrees for 5 minutes before putting them in with a sauce. The sweetness comes out more! 

Other than that, you’re ready to go! 

Do you have any other question about spiralizing a butternut squash? Was this tutorial helpful?

Comments

  1. I’ve found that if you pierce the squash a few times and microwave it only for 2 mins, it makes it much easier to peel and it won’t make the squash mushy before you start cooking.

    • That’s a great tip! I’ll have to share that next time with my readers… I don’t own a microwave though, so I can’t really test it! Sad, right? Thanks for the tip!

      • I bet you could accomplish the same by wrapping the squash in some foil and putting it in the oven at maybe 375 for 5-10 mins… really all you are doing is softening the outer skin connection to the squashy ‘meat’. Might have to give that idea a try!

  2. Very helpful! I just got a spiralizer and haven’t opened it yet. Your site is very appetizing. :)

  3. Thank you!!! Hoping I get one in my farm box this week…if not will be getting one at the store. Squee!

  4. Awesome! I just bought my spiralizer and I cannot get enough. So glad I found your blog because the recipes are endless. Thank you!

  5. I recently found your blog and am totally amazed by all the veggies that can be made into noodles. The recipes look amazing. I plan to buy a spiralizer this weekend and start creating some of those wonderful recipes. A number of my family members have celiac and we do not eat wheat pastas so this will open up a whole new world. Thanks so much.

  6. I’m brand new to your site, having found you on Foodgawker. I’m a carb ADDICT (and I mean, HORRIBLE addict) who’s trying to lose 50 pounds by my 50th birthday #FitBy50
    I bought a spiralizer about 3 weeks ago at the suggestion that zucchini noodles will soon become my best friend, but I haven’t taken it out of the box yet. I adore winter squash, so I’ll have to give this a try. I agree though… danged skins!

  7. I got my spiralizer over the weekend and have gone through six zucchinis and 1 squash already! I made homemade meatballs and sauce and brought in ‘spaghetti’ and meatballs for a friend for lunch. He recognized the zucchini from the green skin but kept asking “But what is the rest of the pasta?” to which I replied, “There is no pasta – it’s all zucchini!” I’m thrilled.

  8. I’ve never spiralized a butternut squash before – but you bet I’m gonna now! :)

  9. I can’t remember, did your review about storing noodles include butternut squash? I’m thinking they might store a bit better than zucchini noodles, but it’s just speculation on my part. I might be inclined to simply wrap the leftover prepped butternut (unspiralized) in some plastic wrap and refrigerate that for later use. I’m looking forward to trying some butternut squash noodles!

  10. never tried before, nice pictures!

  11. You rock!

  12. I LOVE your blog and follow you on instagram. I think this is such a creative way to cook and I just received my spiralizer! I’m making your butternut squash noodles with the asparagus, mushrooms and poached egg tonight for dinner and to save time do you recommend spiralizing the squash before hand? If I do it now and then refrigerate it until 8:00 (or so) will it keep its flavor, etc.? Let me know!

  13. 2 things: 1)I wish I had an indoor greenhouse that I could grow things I love all year and sadly, I live in Michigan so that is a pipedream! Need too many UV lights and the neighbors will probably think I’m doing something illegal(you can see how this could get out of control! lol), 2) I love the tips on how to Spiralize the veggies I’ve come to crave through your blog and DELICIOUS recipes you post!!
    Merry Christmas and keep the yummy food coming. Your use of the Spiralizer is really a great vision you brought to life. Great job!

  14. Tried my spiralizer for the first time…and it wasn’t at all what I expected. The noodles were still connected and I had to go and separate each noodle. I don’t know where I went wrong.

  15. Forget using a peeler on these. Once you’ve cut the ends off your squash just set it upright on the cutting board and use the same big knife you used to cut the ends off to slice thick sections of the skin off, rotating the squash as you work your way around it. It’s so much easier and faster than a peeler.

  16. You’ve definately inspiralized me Ali! I just bought myself a spiralizer and have LOVED making some of your courgette noodle recipies :) But when I tried a butternut squash I had the same problem as Shante… All the noodles were stuck together and didnt seems to be properly cut so I spent 20 minutes trying to peel them apart and couldn’t even seperate some of them :( have you ever had this problem or have any tips? I hope I can use buttnut squash in the future! Thank you from the UK!

    • Steph – I have had this issue before – sometimes using Blade B can help but otherwise – make sure to use a lot of pressure into the blade when spiralizing and spiralize quickly. Speed and pressure helps!

  17. Quick question….Can you freeze butternut squash noodles before cooking? I saw on another blog that it worked with sweet potato noodles, but I am wondering if anyone has ever tried to freeze raw butternut squash noodles? Any advise welcome…I am all about the prepping so I barely have to do anything during the week for dinner!

  18. Hi! I love your site! I just spiraled beets for the first time today! I was curious if you ever spiralize the bulbous bottom part of the butternut squash? Not sure what to do with it..

    • Thanks for your comment! I do not spiralize the bottom, I usually dice whatever is left over from it (it’s seed-y so there’s not much leftover “meat”) and I roast it to use in salads later. THanks for the question!

Trackbacks

  1. […] spiralized (a julienne peeler can also be used- full guide on spiralizing a butternut squash here: http://www.inspiralized.com/2013/10/09/how-to-spiralize-a-butternut-squash/) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp minced garlic 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes 1/2 cup diced celery 1/2 cup diced […]

  2. […] run the peeled squash through the spiralizer, cutting the noodles every 12-15 inches. Here is a helpful guide with pictures of the process. […]

  3. […] more information on making vegetable noodles? Check out Ali’s tutorial with full pictures: http://www.inspiralized.com/2013/10/09/how-to-spiralize-a-butternut-squash/. Photos and Recipe by Ali of […]

  4. […] spiralized (a julienne peeler can also be used- full guide on spiralizing a butternut squash here: http://www.inspiralized.com/2013/10/09/how-to-spiralize-a-butternut-squash/) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp minced garlic 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes 1/2 cup diced celery 1/2 cup diced […]

  5. pal-eo-ology says:

    […] make this tastiness I must start with the how the heck you spiralize a butternut squash – shiz ain’t easy. Don’t worry Inspiralized has some step by step instructions – […]

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